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Campaign aims to increase compliance with energy regulations

Non-compliance with the Energy Performance in Buildings and F-Gas Regulations is costing both business and the environment, according to a new industry campaign.

The Chartered Institution of Building Services Engineers is bringing the matter to the attention of government with rates of compliance of air conditioning inspections at less than 5 per cent (compared to 80 per cent for display energy certificates and 70 to 75 per cent for energy performance certificates).

CIBSE president elect Rob Manning said: “The Non-compliance costs campaign aims to bring together the many voices of frustration and concern to form one united call for action.

“We need to raise the issue of non-compliance up the government agenda and promote the benefits of increasing compliance rates.

“Non-compliance has real costs; it costs the environment, it will cost the UK any chance of meeting the emissions targets and it costs non complying companies who are missing out on a real opportunity to increase their profits.”

The campaign will run for four months, starting at Nemex today and running until the energy event in on 10 September.

Participants can sign up to support the compliance charter which lies at the heart of the campaign.

The charter will spell out the costs of non-compliance and lays out three simple steps which are vital if air conditioning inspection compliance rates are to improve. 

Supporters will also have the opportunity for greater involvement through downloading letters to send to prospective candidates and subsequently to their MPs, as well as to local papers.

CIBSE’s compliance charter:

  • The UK government must acknowledge that air conditioning inspection compliance is not working and must move the responsibility for enforcement away from Trading Standards to a body which is more interested and able to act.
  • The government must set targets for air conditioning and f-gas compliance that the enforcing body agree are achievable and sign up to.
  • The government must increase communication with UK companies informing them of their obligations to comply with air conditioning inspection and f-gas legislation