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Mitsubishi launches ‘reduced refrigerant’ VRF system

Mitsubishi Electric has launched a new AC unit that uses less refrigerant than traditional VRF (Variable Refrigerant Flow) systems whilst providing simultaneous heating and cooling in a simplified two-pipe design, according to the company.

The HVRF system operates without using refrigerant in occupied spaces, removing the need for leak detection equipment and allowing more properties to take advantage of manageable phased installation through the system’s modular design.

At the heart of the new system is an HBC (Hybrid Branch Controller) box, which is connected to the outdoor unit via traditional refrigerant piping. Between the HBC box and the indoor fan coils, the system uses water piping but still offers high sensible cooling and stable room temperatures for maximum comfort.

“Many of our buildings have been traditionally cooled and heated through a combination of chiller technology and oil or gas boilers, but with increasing legislation on energy efficiency and the rising cost of fuel, we now need a low-carbon, cost-effective alternative,” explains Mitsubishi Electric’s Mark Grayston.  “We have developed this new approach to answer the need for energy efficiency and internal comfort.”

Set to rival traditional heating and cooling, the new HVRF system delivers optimum comfort and efficiency, using an innovative combination of unique 2-pipe technology and water to provide simultaneous heating and cooling with heat recovery.

The system is already working to full effect at the offices of mechanical and electrical specialists, Working Environments Ltd, who are using the new air conditioning unit to deliver comfortable and stable internal temperatures for staff at their Southampton headquarters.

Readers' comments (1)

  • I thought this was called a Chiller! OK marketing but this is a bit too much....
    The drawing is also over-simplified and it is not clear at all how they could be doing simultaneously heating and cooling...

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